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SYDNEY WALKS

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Members of the Bold and Beautiful Swim 
									Squad gather for the 1.5km swim from Manly surf beach to Shelly Beach. 3 pixel gap

Shortly before 7am and the "Bold and Beautiful" gather for the 1.5km swim from Manly to Shelly Beach, and back again.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au


You don't have to be bold or beautiful to enjoy a short walk to Shelly Beach

 

The Bold and Beautiful Swim Squad's 1.5km daily return swim from Manly Beach to Shelly Beach starts outside the Manly Surf Club and happens most days of the year. In order to see the start, you'll need to catch the first ferry of the day rom Circular Quay. Alternatively, you can catch the second ferry of the day andget there in time to see the return leg of the swim.

Here is a walk with a difference - not only do you enjoy a glorious Manly foreshore walk but you also get to experience a spectacle along the way.

 

An enthusiastic group of swimmers gather outside the Manly Surf Club at 7am every morning to take part in what has become a ritual happening for days of the year.

 

Members of the Bold and the Beautiful Swim Squad mill around the surf club exchanging pleasantries before heading to the water and donning their distinctive pink caps for a 750-metre swim to Shelly Beach where, after a five or 10-minute breather and a bit more social banter, they dive back into the Tasman Sea and return to Manly.

 

But you don't need to be bold or beautiful, or able to swim, to take part in this spectacle. You can be part of the action by following the swim along the beautiful Shelly Beach walking path at a leisurely walking pace, keeping an eye on the swim but stopping to admire the expensive houses perched on the cliffs above the path.

It's a short walk, but a memorable one, and the path leads to the Cabbage Tree Aquatic Reserve and Shelly Beach

 

The swim takes about 15-20 minutes each way and the men and women who make the journey each morning are young and old and of varying physiques. It seems that having a pot belly doesn't mean you can't swim the 1.5-kilometre distance each morning. There are no St John Ambulance members in attendance so you quickly realise these are all superbly fit individuals.

 

As the swim begins the sea swallows up up to 200 swimmers in what looks like the thrashings of a school of fish. The "school" quickly disappears around the point.

 

Swim from Manly to Shelly Beach 3 pixel gap

Once around the point the swim is on ... and for some the social chatter that began outside the surf club is continuing in the water as they stroke their way to Shelly Beach.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

The walk is an easy one, mostly on level gradings, and you are able to follow the swimmers the whole of gthe way while taking in the mesmerising sea vistas.

 

Following the path you walk past a rock swimming pool where, looking back, the warm-coloured morning light gives rise to the reflections of buildings in the still water,

 

The swimming pool at Fairy Bower on the walk to Shelly Beach, Manly3 pixel gap

The morning light captures the reflections of buildings in a rock pool at Fairy Bower along the walk.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

 

It's not long before the swimmers reach tiny Shelly Beach. One rises out of the water, followed by another, and the numbers standing in the shallows continue to grow until soon even the stragglers have emerged from the water. A fierce social chat is quickly underway and you can't help wondering if the talk is about the strength of the current, the water temperature or what each person has planned for later that day.

 

Bold and Beautiful Clun swimmers arrive at Shelly Beach, Manly 3 pixel gap

Swimmers arrive at Shelly Beach, having just swum 750m. A 5-10-minute social chat and then back to Manly.    Picture: © Sydney.com.au

 

For a short time courtesies are extended - courtesies that involve standing and engaging in idle talk so as to allow lesser swimmers a chance to get their breath back - but soon the serious mermans and mermaids are anxious to to return to the water and power their way back to Manly. The others follow suit and soon the beach is again devoid of human presence. Cabbage Tree Bay is quiet, apart from the sounds of breakfast being served at The Boat Shed, a delightful cafe-restaurant a stone's throw from Shelly Beach.

 

 

Swimmers start the 750-metre swim back to Manly Beach from Shelly Beach 3 pixel gap

Swimmers take off on the return leg.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

 

The Boat Shed is surprisingly busy at this time of the morning. It's barely 7.30am and seats are being snapped up by morning strollers and clifftop inhabitants who don't have to rush offf to work. A schoolgirl lounges on a seat in front of a stylish gas-log open fire while her mother sips on a caffè latte. Businessmen discuss deals over breakfast while young women meet up for a for morning coffee before rushing off to the Circular Quay ferry.

 

Boat Shed cafe and restaurant at Shelly Beach, Manly 3 pixel gap

The Boat Shed, a popular meeting place for breakfast and lunch at Shelly Beach and Cabbage Tree Aquatic Reserve.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

Rachel and Lola at the Boat Shed at Shelly Beach, Manly 3 pixel gap

Rachel gets a kiss from Lola as she enjoys her 7.30am capucchino at The Boat Shed Boat restaurant and cafe, which is pet friendly.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

View of Shelly Beach from The Boat Shed, Manly 3 pixel gap

Views of Shelly Beach and further afield make a delightful backdrop for breakfast.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

 

South of The Boat Shed a set of stairs leads up to a car park. Here there are walking paths with vantage points that look out over the ocean and south to inspiring cliff formations. At one of the lookouts two women are taking instruction from a male personal trainer with a spectacular rocky cliff as a backdrop.

 

Views of the rockly Manly coastline near North Head 3 pixel gap

A short walk from Shelly Beach are some breathtaking views of the rockly Manly coastline near North Head.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

 

On the return journey to Manly you get to see Shelly Beach, the walking path and clifftop homes from an entirely new perspective. You're walking north with the sun in a different position, the light has changed and because you're no longer concenbtrating on swimmers in the water you see things you hadn't seen on the way over. A small cafe pops up on the walking path - blowed if I'd noticed that before! What's more, its sidewalk tables are buzzing with people.

 

Fairy Bower Restaurant, half way between Shelly Beach and Manly, is packed with walkers. 3 pixel gap

The Fairy Bower Restaurant, half way between Shelly Beach and Manly, is packed with morning walkers.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

The walk back to Manly is delightful and you begin to notice how many people are now on the walking path. If you were lucky enough to live in Manly, it's hard to imagine not doing this walk each morning. You may not get the exhilaration the Bold and Beautiful get from their Herculean swims, but you couldn't help but return home with a big smile on your face.

 

GETTING THERE:
Catch the first Manly ferry departing Circular Quay at 5.30am. This ferry arrives at Manly Wharf at 6am. There is a 6.20am ferry but it doesn't arrive until 6.50am, which could mean that unless you hurry to the beach you may miss the start of the swim.

From Manly Wharf, walk down The Corso to the surf beach. At the beach, turn right and you will see the Manly Surf Club at the end of the beach.

 

Walking path from Manly to Shelly Beach at 8am on an autumn morning3 pixel gap

It's barely 8am yet the walking path from Manly to Shelly Beach is lined with people.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au

A seaside house perched atop the rocks at Fairy Bower, Manly3 pixel gap

One of the expensive homes perched atop the rocks at Fairy Bower that tower above the Shelly Beach walk.   Picture: © Sydney.com.au